CAKE & Ben Folds

CAKE & Ben Folds

CAKE’s adherence to their original guiding principles has only grown stronger. Originally formed as a somewhat antagonistic answer to grunge, CAKE’s democratic processes, defiant self-reliance, and lucid yet ever-inventive music has made them a nation-state unto themselves, with no obvious peers, belonging to no school. In addition to writing, arranging, producing, and performing their own music, they have taught themselves to engineer & produce their recording projects in their own solar-powered studio in Sacramento, CA — which actually generates more power than is needed to run it (causing the building’s electrical meter to run in reverse). Additionally, CAKE’s go green advocacy will continue this summer… the band gives away a native tree at every performance (and have done so for the past 12 years). When you attend a CAKE concert, there is always a tree on stage throughout their performance, and at some point during the evening one lucky audience member (who is willing the make the commitment to be a lifelong steward for the tree) gets to take it home. The CAKE Forest can be seen here: http://www.cakemusic.com/world/

CAKE’s most recent album, SHOWROOM OF COMPASSION, debuted at #1 on Billboard’s “Top 200” Chart and was touted for its “deadpan brilliance” by The New Yorker. The band is currently in the recording studio working on their ninth album, due for release later this year.

For more, please visit http://www.cakemusic.com/


Ben Folds is widely regarded as one of the major music influencers of our generation. He has created an enormous body of genre-bending music that includes pop albums with Ben Folds Five, multiple solo albums, and collaborative records with artists spanning Sara Bareilles, Regina Spektor, and William Shatner.

Folds’ most recent work, 2015’s SO THERE, blended original songs with his critically acclaimed “Concerto For Piano and Orchestra” and soared to #1 on Billboard’s “Classical” and “Classical Crossover” charts. For over a decade, Folds has performed with some of the world’s greatest symphony orchestras. In 2017, he was named as the first-ever Artistic Advisor to the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center.

Folds continues to perform with symphonies and also recently returned to solo touring, delivering a high-energy rock show with the intimacy of a solo piano performance.

For more, please visit http://www.benfolds.com/

Getting there is half the fun, as the old saying goes, but the journey is really the whole point for Boston electrofolk duo Tall Heights. Singer/guitarist Tim Harrington and singer/cellist Paul Wright know where they’ve been, and where they want to go. As for the route, well, “we’re just mapping it out as we take it, day by day,” says Harrington.

They’ve reached their biggest junction so far — Neptune, out now, is Tall Heights’ first album for Sony Music Masterworks, and the latest step in the ongoing evolution of their sound and style.

Harrington and Wright formed Tall Heights in 2010, keeping their songs stripped down to their essential elements, in part, to make it simpler to perform on the streets of Boston.

Neptune is a far lusher construct: along with pristine and emotive vocal harmonies, there’s subtly chugging electric guitar and a spare descending bassline on “Iron in the Fire,” ethereal synthesizers and a spacious drum part on “Spirit Cold,” a brittle splash of percussion to open “Backwards and Forwards” and feedback created by two cellphones on “Cross My Mind.”

“It was helpful and I think comforting to define ourselves as two vocalists, guitar and cello,” Wright says. “There was a beauty and a simplicity, and stepping outside of that box is pretty scary, because you’re forced to redefine yourself and do some sonic soul-searching. I think this record reflects the results of that scary step.”

The band’s broadening sound came from the musicians’ conscious effort to push themselves, and each other, to create in new ways. By relying on a few core elements at the start, the duo learned to make the most of their minimalist set-up. “It taught us to be lean and mean and effective with just two voices and two instruments,” Harrington says. “It made us consider vocal tone and the way voices can mesh and interact.”

As those lessons took root, the pair essentially gave themselves permission to push their musical boundaries outward over three separate recording sessions at Color Study studio in tiny Goshen, Vermont, that yielded songs for their 2015 EP Holding On, Holding Out, and for Neptune. Not only did Harrington and Wright expand their sonic palette throughout the process, they also altered their approach to writing. The musicians tend to develop ideas separately, before one brings a new song to the other for further development. It’s a reflection of their early days sharing musical ideas, when Wright was living overseas and Harrington was finishing up college.

“We would send each other terrible sound-recorder voice memo files and we’d write these nice emails to each other about each other’s songs, so creating concepts independently is something we’ve always done,” says Wright, who has been friends with Harrington since they were kids growing up in the central Massachusetts town of Sturbridge.

They changed the formula on Neptune. Four songs on the album — “River Wider,” “Infrared,” “Cross My Mind” and “Growing” — are the result of one musician looping a simple instrumental part and letting the other write lyrics for it. With the last recording session looming, the duo worked faster than usual on those songs, particularly the somber, atmospheric “Cross My Mind.” “We were under the gun, he was downstairs making one thing, I was upstairs making another thing, we put them together and then we workshopped it in the car on the drive up to the studio,” says Harrington, whose Boston apartment is literally upstairs from Wright’s.

Their ever-closer collaboration, and the time they gave themselves in the studio to develop it, is indicative of the band’s developing approach to making music. “I can hear the evolution happening,” Harrington says. “I feel like we’re walking across a bridge from one place to another, and maybe I’ll always feel that way, but I’m really happy with how we’re moving.”

“Intimate and arresting” – NPR

“Tall Heights employ a collection of acoustic guitar, cello, and electronic drums,​ ​reminiscent of contemporary indie folk giants like Justin Vernon and Fleet​ ​Foxes.”​​ – XPN

“In addition to finger-picked guitar, swelling cello and tight,​ ​prismatic vocal harmonies, ‘Spirit Cold’ boasts a bold, airy drum part​ ​that propels the song through the peaks and troughs of the​ ​arrangement.”​ – Wall Street Journal​

“It’s a contemporary sound that is not without its ageless qualities.” – Chicago Sun Times

“Certifiably unclassifiable” – Boston Herald

“There have been many bands in recent years that have employed beautiful close harmonies, but when you add the strings and the great songwriting, Tall Heights is a notch above the pack.” – WBEZ

“Call it simply gorgeous.” – WFUV

$45.00 - $279.00

Tickets

Please note- there's an 8 ticket limit for this show. Patrons exceeding the ticket limit will have their order cancelled automatically & without notice. No refunds or exchanges.

Attention: Parking at MPP has Changed!  Everyone MUST pre-select parking (or decline parking) once tickets have been bought.  Once you’ve completed your ticket transaction, you’ll receive a link to select your FREE parking. Please do so in advance before arriving at the show.

Note to ridesharers, walkers, bussers & cyclists: If you have made other transportation arrangements, you don't have to select parking.

Click HERE to view parking for this show

Who’s Going

Upcoming Events
Merriweather Post Pavilion