Mystic Braves

Mystic Braves

Mystic Braves’ might be rooted in the psychedelic scene of the 1960s, but the band’s moment is happening right now.


After an impressive national tour boasting packed shows from Brooklyn to Seattle and beyond, the band returned home to Los Angeles only to sell out their first-ever show at West Hollywood’s legendary Troubadour in advance. It’s only the latest in a string of triumphs for the band, who saw record turnout around the country as they toured in advance of a forthcoming third album.


Based in Echo Park, the Braves — who are signed to influential indie label Lolipop Records — are at the forefront of a white-hot garage band revival, and when the band isn’t selling out shows across the country, they’re playing alongside legendary groups like The Zombies or providing the soundtrack for can’t-miss fashion events like Saint Laurent Paris’ Spring-Summer 2015 collection. While the group — made up of Julian Ducatenzeiler on guitar and vocals, Tony Malacara on bass and vocals, Shane Stotsenberg on guitar and vocals, Cameron Gartung on drums and Ignacio Gonzalez on organ and tambourine — isn’t straying far from what Ducatenzeiler calls “a blend of influence and sound that is unprecedented in contemporary music” on the forthcoming album, there are certainly changes afoot.


“We’ve always been a pop-structured psych band and we’re continuing along those lines,” Ducatenzeiler says. “But we’re trying some new things out as well. We’ve elevated the songwriting” Indeed, the group is experimenting with more exotic instruments and is building a library of new songs to show off its invigorating style not only in the studio but at a series of big-ticket festivals including Burgerama, Desert Days and the Austin Psych Fest.


It’s a long way from how the band began. “We had no idea when we started that we’d come as far as we have,” Ducatenzeiler says. “But from the moment we released our demos, people have really responded.”

L.A. Witch knows how to conjure up the demons in pop. Although the band is only a few years old, one root stretches into the sounds of '60s garage musicians like The Pleasure Seekers and Sonics while the other digs around in Dead Moon and The Breeders.

Their music is raw and bloody, echoing of bad decisions through a thick, smoky haze of reverb. Just like their influences, L.A. Witch preaches the blues; these aren't happy ballads, but if you submerse yourself in them, you come out feeling a hell of a lot better than before.

The Creation Factory

People don't dance anymore to rock bands, but The Creation Factory is here to change that.

Channeling the sounds of 1960s psychedelic beats, the Los Angeles-based five-piece isn't just making music—"we're capturing the sort of sounds that people don't hear anymore," says front man Shane Stots—it's creating an experience.

"We're bringing sounds back from the grave, maybe better than they were before," Stots, who's also a member of L.A. rock group the Mystic Braves, says—and he's not kidding. The group uses authentic 1960s gear (and an era-appropriate look) to create blues-inflected rock designed to get a crowd's feet moving. It's no wonder, then, that the band—which sold out its first show and has a 45 forthcoming on Lolipop Records—will be opening for the Mystic Braves on a sure-to-be-soulful upcoming West Coast tour.

The Creation Factory was formed in 2014 when Stots pieced together a style-infused gang of psychedelic bandits, including band members Iggy Gonzalez (also of the Mystic Braves) on drums, Neil Soiland and Gabriel Pacheco on guitar and Peter Maffei (of The Electric Magpie) on keyboards. Stots himself provides bass and lead vocals.

While the musical appeal of The Creation Factory's hard to ignore, Stots insists the band's also out to show fans what they've been missing. "I'm trying to revive music and expose it to a younger generation," he says. "I'm going backwards to go forward."

So, while the past is firmly on The Creation Factory's side, it's the future that truly belongs to the band.

Cheap Tissue

Directly east of the not-so- bright lights of Downtown Los Angeles, three young men met under a
janky fire escape next to a dumpster and put their shriveled, pocketed dollar bills and loose change
together to pay for the necessities (mostly booze) of starting a new band.
Furthering their minimal efforts in the dull, cultural wasteland known as Echo Park in June 2015:
Andrew Taylor, Jesse Youngblood and Sean Carroll began to write songs with a high level of energy they
felt most people would not really like very much at all. Shortly after, the three found John Tyree
(Richmond Sluts/Dirty Eyes) lurking around the same local dives without a pot to piss in himself. The
four got together infrequently over the next six months and put the not-so- polished touches on the turd
that is CHEAP TISSUE.

Though most would describe CT as a garage-punk/rock 'n' roll outfit, they prefer being referred
to as a very small, extremely sub-par orchestra with no conductor and the tendency to play songs at
whatever tempo they feel like.

Brandishing snarling, fuzzy guitars and three "singers" up front, Cheap Tissue is coming to
sloppily satisfy the needs of your girlfriend, sister and mother. And guess what? You won't even care.

$16 ADV - $20 DOOR

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