Mt. Joy

Mt. Joy is an Indie Folk band from Philadelphia, currently recording their first full-length album in Los Angeles, CA.

Matt Quinn (Vocals/Guitar) and Sam Cooper (Guitar) met in high school and started performing songs together in 2005.

After heading off to separate colleges, they continued to bounce song ideas off each other when they could. However, when it became clear music wasn't going to pay the rent, Sam went to law school in Philadelphia and Matt moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in music management. In Matt's words, "When I moved to LA I knew I still wanted to write songs, but the realities of life made that dream seem pretty impossible." A year later in early 2016, Sam followed a job opportunity to Los Angeles. While both were working long hours, they began working on music together in their spare time. The pair recorded 4 original songs with producer Caleb Nelson in the spring of 2016 in Caleb's living room. They chose the name "Mt. Joy" as an ode to a mountain in Valley Forge National Park near Sam's childhood home.

After the records were made, the guys were proud of the songs. But, with little hope at ever reaching a large audience, Cooper took a job as a lawyer back in Philadelphia and Quinn enrolled in law school in Los Angeles.

However, that fall, their first single "Astrovan" began taking off on streaming platforms, and Matt and Sam decided to put their other careers on hold. Matt dropped out of law school and Sam left his job to focus full-time on Mt. Joy. Soon after, Michael Byrne (bass), Sotiris Eliopoulos (drums), and Andrew Butler (keys) joined and expanded the duo to a full 5-piece band.

Mt. Joy's folk rock sound can be attributed to some of the band's biggest influences: Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, The Grateful Dead, The Beatles, and even contemporaries such as The Alabama Shakes, My Morning Jacket, and Vampire Weekend. After much debate, Matt and Sam agreed on their all-time favorite record: The Allman Brothers Live at Fillmore East 1971.

Mt. Joy's full EP will be out in March.

From the first moments of Trevor Sensor's debut EP for Jagjaguwar, Texas Girls and Jesus Christ, the Illinois-born 22-year-old singer/songwriter's distinctive burr of a voice sounds aged decades beyond his years. The rest of the young talent's music follows suit, too, with timeless-sounding melodies and a sense of songwriting that exudes maturity while still feeling fresh.

Sensor wrote the music featured on Texas Girls and Jesus Christ on a borrowed acoustic guitar that he has yet to return, composing songs that sound deeply felt and from a place of truth and honesty. "If I'm trying to do anything, it's to be sincere," he says about his songwriting approach."A lot of singer/songwriters today are oriented in irony. It's cooler to be lackadaisical rather than to try to be compelling."

And Sensor's music, above all else, is compelling: the proclamatory howls that close out the piano-ed "Pacing the Cage," the dark desolation of "Satan's Man," and the dynamic blowout of the EP's title track grab your attention and refuse to let go. "I think it's very boring when people choose one dynamic and go with it," Sensor opines on the full-band jolt that takes place in the thrilling back half of "Texas Girls and Jesus Christ. "It's more interesting to me when people try to mix things up and treat every song as if it were its own person."

"Songs are gateways into little worlds, and different worlds do different things," Sensor states regarding his approach to songcraft, and this EP finds him, an English major with an affinity for writers ranging from Marcel Proust to Dave Eggers, crafting lyrical atmospheres stuffed with confessional lines that leave a mark and visual allusions that aren't easily shaken. With Texas Girls and Jesus Christ, Sensor's presented his own little worlds for listeners to explore -- with many more to follow.

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