Cloud Nothings

Cloud Nothings

Cloud Nothings was founded in a Cleveland basement, the one-man recording project of Dylan Baldi, an unassuming, then 18-year- old student of song with a remarkable ear for melody. Prolific from the start, Baldi’s early work was rough but immediate: crudely recorded, spring-loaded spasms of Buzzcocks-informed pop that quickly found an online following among the lo-fi- inclined. When an opportunity presented itself to open a small show in Brooklyn, Baldi abandoned a still-in- progress final project to be there. The gamble paid off.

In 2010, Carpark unveiled Turning On, a retrospective introduction that combined early 7″ singles and the full-length debut (a limited release on cassette and vinyl) from which it took its name. The following year, Cloud Nothings made its proper Carpark debut with a thrilling self-titled LP that found Baldi in a studio for the first time, shedding the many layers of hiss and distortion that had once obscured (or enhanced) his every hook. What followed was an unexpected breakthrough, 2012’s Attack on Memory, an album that very loudly (with the help of producer Steve Albini) announced the arrival of Cloud Nothings as the sound of more than just Baldi: Caustic and cathartic, it marked the first time Baldi wrote with and for his longtime touring band, drummer Jayson Gerycz, bassist TJ Duke and since departed guitarist Joe Boyer. While its rightly acclaimed and hastily recorded follow-up, 2014’s Here and Nowhere Else refined and expanded upon the volcanic interplay that galvanized its predecessor, it also found Baldi realizing his potential as a singer and the leader of an undeniably great rock band.

Which brings us to Life Without Sound, his most polished and outwardly reflective set of songs to date. Workshopped over the course of a year with his bandmates, it’s an album rich in both worldly insight and incandescent detail. Smart, nuanced, and immensely listenable, this is guitar-driven op as it should be—conceived by a songwriter who continues to sound like one of the finest of his generation.

The music of L.A.-based guitarist, singer, and songwriter Kayla Cohen is mutable and multivalent, richly allusive of the hermetic worlds of private-press canyon-cult mystics and East Coast noiseniks alike. Her adept fingerstyle guitar work—nimble but unshowy, always at the service of framing her plaintively unspooling modal progressions and gorgeous, moonlit voice—centers these melancholy pastorales in a hazy, heat-mirage space equally suggestive of familiarity and distance, community and anomie. Itasca’s enchanting, acid folk-inflected PoB debut is also the first to feature a full band

Never Young

Over the last two years Never Young have become a staple of the Northern Californian music scene. Formed in 2014 around the songwriting partnership of childhood friends Christopher Adams and Nikolas Soelter, they've developed a unique, urgent blend of 90's punk combined with an idiosyncratic knack for writing angular pop songs. They've been described as "Sonic Youth, At The Drive In, and My Bloody Valentine having a ménage à trois", an exceedingly tight, hook filled slab of noise.

For Singles Tape II: SoftBank, the quartet leans into their pop inclinations, finding solace in bright melodies and clever structures. There's the immediacy of "Beta Male Erotica" and its shimmering guitars, the simple, chanty refrain of "Soap," and the dense, churning energy of "Gasoline Aphrodisiac," ending in the climactic declaration, 'and I like it', repeated over and over before cymbals crash and scraping guitars conclude. The five-song EP was recorded in San Francisco at Ruminator Audio with Monte Vallier (Wax Idols, Weekend) with production aid from Shaun Durkan of Weekend. Singles Tape II: SoftBank will be released on October 14, 2016 via Father/Daughter Records.

Kid Trails

Laid back southern transplant rock. Based in Oakland, California

$20 ADV - $22 DOOR

Sold Out

Who’s Going

79

Upcoming Events
The Independent